John Wayne

Biography

Marion Mitchell Morrison (born Marion Robert Morrison; May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), better known by his stage name John Wayne, was an American film actor, director and producer. An Academy Award-winner, Wayne was among the top box office draws for three decades, and was named the all-time top money-making star. An enduring American icon, he epitomized rugged masculinity and is famous for his demeanor, including his distinctive calm voice, walk, and height. Wayne was born in Winterset, Iowa but his family relocated to the greater Los Angeles area when he was four years old. He found work at local film studios when he lost his football scholarship to USC as a result of a bodysurfing accident. Initially working for the Fox Film Corporation, he mostly appeared in small bit parts. His acting breakthrough came in 1939 with John Ford's Stagecoach, making him an instant star. Wayne would go on to star in 142 pictures, primarily typecast in Western films. Among his best known films are The Quiet Man (1952), which follows him as an Irish-American boxer and his love affair with a fiery spinster played by Maureen O'Hara; The Searchers (1956), in which he plays a Civil War veteran who seeks out his abducted niece; Rio Bravo (1959), playing a Sheriff with Dean Martin; True Grit (1969), playing a humorous U.S. Marshal who sets out to avenge a man's death in the role that won Wayne an Academy Award; and The Shootist (1976), his final screen performance in which he plays an aging gunslinger battling cancer. Wayne moved to Orange County, California in the 1960s, and was a prominent Republican in Hollywood, supporting anti-communist positions. He died of stomach cancer in 1979. In June 1999, the American Film Institute named Wayne 13th among the Greatest Male Screen Legends of All Time. Early Life Wayne was born Marion Robert Morrison at 216 South Second Street in Winterset, Iowa. His middle name was soon changed from Robert to Mitchell when his parents decided to name their next son Robert. Wayne's father, Clyde Leonard Morrison (1884–1937), was the son of American Civil War veteran Marion Mitchell Morrison (1845–1915). Wayne's mother, the former Mary "Molly" Alberta Brown (1885–1970), was from Lancaster County, Nebraska. Wayne was of Scots-Irish and Scottish descent on both sides of his family, and he was brought up as a Presbyterian. Wayne's family moved to Palmdale, California, and then in 1911 to Glendale, California, where his father worked as a pharmacist. A local fireman at the station on his route to school in Glendale started calling him "Little Duke" because he never went anywhere without his huge Airedale Terrier, Duke. He preferred "Duke" to "Marion", and the name stuck for the rest of his life. As a teen, Wayne worked in an ice cream shop for a man who shod horses for Hollywood studios. He was also active as a member of the Order of DeMolay, a youth organization associated with the Freemasons. He attended Wilson Middle School in Glendale. He played football for the 1924 champion Glendale High School team. Wayne applied to the U.S. Naval Academy, but was not accepted. He instead attended the University of Southern California (USC), majoring in pre-law. He was a member of the Trojan Knights and Sigma Chi fraternities. Wayne also played on the USC football team under coach Howard Jones. An injury curtailed his athletic career; Wayne later noted he was too terrified of Jones's reaction to reveal the actual cause of his injury, which was bodysurfing at the "Wedge" at the tip of the Balboa Peninsula in Newport Beach. He lost his athletic scholarship and, without funds, had to leave the university. Wayne began working at the local film studios. Prolific silent western film star Tom Mix had found him a summer job in the prop department in exchange for football tickets. Wayne soon moved on to bit parts, establishing a longtime friendship with the director who provided most of those roles, John Ford. Early in this period, Wayne appeared with his USC teammates playing football in Brown of Harvard (1926), The Dropkick (1927), and Salute (1929) and Columbia's Maker of Men (filmed in 1930, released in 1931). Early Career and Breakthrough While working for Fox Film Corporation in bit roles, he was given on-screen credit as "Duke Morrison" only once, in Words and Music (1929). In 1930, director Raoul Walsh saw him moving studio furniture while working as a prop boy and cast him in his first starring role in The Big Trail (1930). For his screen name, Walsh suggested "Anthony Wayne", after Revolutionary War general "Mad Anthony" Wayne. Fox Studios chief Winfield Sheehan rejected it as sounding "too Italian". Walsh then suggested "John Wayne". Sheehan agreed, and the name was set. Wayne himself was not even present for the discussion. The Big Trail was to be the first big-budget outdoor spectacle of the sound era, made at a staggering cost of over $2 million, using hundreds of extras and wide vistas of the American southwest, still largely unpopulated at the time. To take advantage of the breathtaking scenery, it was filmed in two versions, a standard 35mm version and another in the new 70 mm Grandeur film process using innovative camera and lenses. Many in the audience who saw it in Grandeur stood and cheered. Unfortunately, only a handful of theaters were equipped to show the film in its widescreen process, and the effort was largely wasted. The film was considered a huge flop. After the commercial failure of The Big Trail, Wayne was relegated to small roles in A-pictures, including Columbia's The Deceiver (1931), in which he played a corpse. He appeared in the serial The Three Musketeers (1933), an updated version of the Alexandre Dumas novel in which the protagonists were soldiers in the French Foreign Legion in then-contemporary North Africa. He appeared in many low-budget "Poverty Row" westerns, mostly at Monogram Pictures and serials for Mascot Pictures Corporation. By Wayne's own estimation, he appeared in about eighty of these horse operas from 1930 to 1939. In Riders of Destiny (1933) he became one of the first singing cowboys of film, albeit via dubbing. Wayne also appeared in some of the Three Mesquiteers westerns, whose title was a play on the Dumas classic. He was mentored by stuntmen in riding and other western skills. He and famed stuntman Yakima Canutt developed and perfected stunts still used today. Wayne's breakthrough role came with director John Ford's classic Stagecoach (1939). Because of Wayne's non-star status and track record in low-budget westerns throughout the 1930s, Ford had difficulty getting financing for what was to be an A-budget film. After rejection by all the top studios, Ford struck a deal with independent producer Walter Wanger in which Claire Trevor — a much bigger star at the time — received top billing. Stagecoach was a huge critical and financial success, and Wayne became a star. America's entry into World War II resulted in a deluge of support for the war effort from all sectors of society, and Hollywood was no exception. Wayne was exempted from service due to his age (34 at the time of Pearl Harbor) and family status, classified as 3-A (family deferment). He repeatedly wrote to John Ford, asking to be placed in Ford's military unit, but consistently postponed it until "after he finished one more film", Wayne did not attempt to prevent his reclassification as 1-A (draft eligible), but Republic Studios was emphatically resistant to losing him; Herbert J. Yates, President of Republic, threatened Wayne with a lawsuit if he walked away from his contract and Republic Pictures intervened in the Selective Service process, requesting Wayne's further deferment. Wayne toured U.S. bases and hospitals in the South Pacific for three months in 1943 and 1944. By many accounts, Wayne's failure to serve in the military was the most painful experience of his life.[31] His widow later suggested that his patriotism in later decades sprang from guilt, writing: "He would become a 'superpatriot' for the rest of his life trying to atone for staying home." Commercial Success Wayne's first color film was Shepherd of the Hills (1941), in which he co-starred with his longtime friend Harry Carey. The following year, he appeared in his only film directed by Cecil B. DeMille, the Technicolor epic Reap the Wild Wind (1942), in which he co-starred with Ray Milland and Paulette Goddard; it was one of the rare times he played a character with questionable values. He would appear in more than twenty of John Ford's films throughout the next two decades, including She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), The Quiet Man (1952), The Searchers (1956), The Wings of Eagles (1957), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). In 1949, director Robert Rossen offered the starring role of All the King's Men to Wayne. Wayne refused, believing the script to be un-American in many ways. Broderick Crawford, who eventually got the role, won the 1949 Oscar for best male actor, ironically beating out Wayne, who had been nominated for Sands of Iwo Jima. He lost the leading role in The Gunfighter (1950) to Gregory Peck due to his refusal to work for Columbia Pictures because its chief, Harry Cohn, had mistreated him years before when he was a young contract player. Cohn had bought the project for Wayne, but Wayne's grudge was too deep, and Cohn sold the script to Twentieth Century Fox, which cast Peck in the role Wayne badly wanted but for which he refused to bend. One of Wayne's most popular roles was in The High and the Mighty (1954), directed by William Wellman, and based on a novel by Ernest K. Gann. His portrayal of a heroic copilot won widespread acclaim. Wayne also portrayed aviators in Flying Tigers (1942), Flying Leathernecks (1951), Island in the Sky (1953), The Wings of Eagles (1957), and Jet Pilot (1957). The Searchers (1956) continues to be widely regarded as perhaps Wayne's finest and most complex performance. In 2006, Premiere Magazine ran an industry poll in which Wayne's portrayal of Ethan Edwards was rated the 87th greatest performance in film history. He named his youngest son Ethan after the character. Later Career John Wayne won a Best Actor Oscar for True Grit (1969). Wayne was also nominated as the producer of Best Picture for The Alamo (1960), one of two films he directed. The other was The Green Berets (1968), the only major film made during the Vietnam War to support the War. During the filming of Green Berets, the Degar or Montagnard people of Vietnam's Central Highlands, fierce fighters against communism, bestowed on Wayne a brass bracelet that he wore in the film and all subsequent films. An interview Wayne gave in 1971 to Playboy magazine became a hot topic, as Wayne made headlines for controversial remarks about social issues and race relations in the United States. His comments about the perceived lack of leadership experience among black people and inequities of the past made headlines. In the same interview he expressed his support for the Vietnam War. His last film was The Shootist (1976), whose main character, J. B. Books, was dying of cancer — the illness to which Wayne himself succumbed three years later. According to the Internet Movie Database, Wayne played the lead in 142 of his film appearances. Batjac, the production company co-founded by Wayne, was named after the fictional shipping company Batjak in Wake of the Red Witch (1948), a film based on the novel by Garland Roark. (A spelling error by Wayne's secretary was allowed to stand, accounting for the variation.)[33] Batjac (and its predecessor, Wayne-Fellows Productions) was the arm through which Wayne produced many films for himself and other stars. Its best-known non-Wayne production was the highly acclaimed Seven Men From Now (1956), which started the classic collaboration between director Budd Boetticher and star Randolph Scott. In the Motion Picture Herald Top Ten Money-Making Western Stars poll, Wayne was listed in 1936 and 1939. He appeared in the similar Box Office poll in 1939 and 1940. While these two polls are really an indication only of the popularity of series stars, Wayne also appeared in the Top Ten Money Makers Poll of all films from 1949 to 1957 and 1958 to 1974, taking first place in 1950, 1951, 1954 and 1971. With a total of 25 years on the list, Wayne has more appearances than any other star, beating Clint Eastwood (21) into second place. In later years, Wayne was recognized as a sort of American natural resource, and his various critics, of his performances and his politics, viewed him with more respect. Abbie Hoffman, the radical of the 1960s, paid tribute to Wayne's singularity, saying, "I like Wayne's wholeness, his style. As for his politics, well — I suppose even cavemen felt a little admiration for the dinosaurs that were trying to gobble them up." Reviewing The Cowboys (1972), Vincent Canby of the New York Times, who did not particularly care for the film, wrote: "Wayne is, of course, marvelously indestructible, and he has become an almost perfect father figure." Personal Life Wayne was married three times and divorced twice. His wives were Josephine Alicia Saenz, Esperanza Baur, and Pilar Pallete. He had four children with Josephine: Michael Wayne (November 23, 1934 – April 2, 2003), Mary Antonia "Toni" Wayne LaCava (February 25, 1936 — December 6, 2000), Patrick Wayne (born July 15, 1939), and Melinda Wayne Munoz (born December 3, 1940). He had three more children with Pilar: Aissa Wayne (born March 31, 1956), John Ethan Wayne (born February 22, 1962), and Marisa Wayne (born February 22, 1966). Several of Wayne's children entered the film and television industry; Wayne's son Ethan was billed as John Ethan Wayne in a few films, and played one of the leads in the 1990s update of the Adam-12 television series. His stormiest divorce was from Esperanza Baur, a former Mexican actress. She convinced herself that Wayne and co-star Gail Russell were having an affair. The night the film Angel and the Badman (1947) wrapped, there was the usual party for cast and crew, and Wayne came home very late. Esperanza was in a drunken rage by the time he arrived, and she attempted to shoot him as he walked through the front door. Wayne had several high-profile affairs, including one with Marlene Dietrich that lasted for three years. In the years prior to his death, Wayne was romantically involved with his former secretary Pat Stacy (1941–1995). She published a biography of her life with him entitled Duke: A Love Story in 1983. Wayne's hair began thinning in the 1940s, and he started wearing a hairpiece by the end of that decade. He was occasionally seen in public without the hairpiece (notably, according to Life magazine, at Gary Cooper's funeral). During a widely noted appearance at Harvard University, Wayne was asked by a student, "Where did you get that phony hair?" He responded, "It's not phony. It's real hair. Of course, it's not mine, but it's real." A close friend of Wayne's, California Congressman Alphonzo Bell, wrote of him, "Duke's personality and sense of humor were very close to what the general public saw on the big screen. It is perhaps best shown in these words he had engraved on a plaque: 'Each of us is a mixture of some good and some not so good qualities. In considering one's fellow man it's important to remember the good things ... We should refrain from making judgments just because a fella happens to be a dirty, rotten SOB.'" Wayne biographer Michael Munn chronicled Wayne's drinking habits. According to Sam O'Steen's memoir, Cut to the Chase, studio directors knew to shoot Wayne's scenes before noon, because by afternoon he "was a mean drunk". He had been a chain-smoker of cigarettes since young adulthood and was diagnosed with lung cancer in 1964. He underwent successful surgery to remove his entire left lung and four ribs. Despite efforts by his business associates to prevent him from going public with his illness for fear that it would cost him work, Wayne announced he had cancer and called on the public to get preventive examinations. Five years later, Wayne was declared cancer-free. Despite the fact that his diminished lung capacity left him incapable of prolonged exertion and frequently in need of supplemental oxygen, within a few years of his operation he chewed tobacco and began smoking cigars until the day he died. Wayne's height has been perennially described as at least 6'4" (193 cm). He was a Freemason, a Master Mason in Marion McDaniel Lodge #56 F&AM, in Tucson, Arizona. He became a 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Mason and later joined the Al Malaikah Shrine Temple in Los Angeles. He became a member of the York Rite. During the early 1960s, John Wayne traveled extensively to Panama, during which he purchased the island of Taborcillo off the main coast. It was sold by his estate at his death and changed hands many times before being opened as a tourist attraction. Wayne's yacht, the Wild Goose, was one of his favorite possessions. He kept it docked in Newport Harbor and it was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 2011. Death Although he enrolled in a cancer vaccine study in an attempt to ward off the disease, John Wayne died of stomach cancer on June 11, 1979, at the UCLA Medical Center, and was interred in the Pacific View Memorial Park cemetery in Corona del Mar. According to his son Patrick and his grandson Matthew Muñoz, a priest in the California Diocese of Orange, he converted to Roman Catholicism shortly before his death. He requested his tombstone read "Feo, Fuerte y Formal", a Spanish epitaph Wayne described as meaning "ugly, strong and dignified". However, the grave, unmarked for twenty years, is now marked with a quotation from his controversial 1971 Playboy interview: "Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday." Among the 220 or so cast and crew who filmed the 1956 film, The Conqueror, on location near St. George, Utah, 91 at various times developed some form of cancer (41%), including stars Wayne, Susan Hayward, and Agnes Moorehead, and director Dick Powell. The film was shot in southwestern Utah, east of and generally downwind from the site of recent U.S. Government nuclear weapons tests in southeastern Nevada. Although the 41% incidence of cancer in the cast and crew is very close to that of the general population, many contend radioactive fallout from these tests contaminated the film location and poisoned the film crew working there. Despite the suggestion that Wayne's 1964 lung cancer and his 1979 stomach cancer resulted from nuclear contamination, he himself believed his lung cancer to have been a result of his six-pack-a-day cigarette habit. Awards, Celebrations, and Landmarks John Wayne's enduring status as an iconic American was formally recognized by the U.S. government by awarding him the two highest civilian decorations. He was recognized by the United States Congress on May 26, 1979, when he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal. Hollywood figures and American leaders from across the political spectrum, including Maureen O'Hara, Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra, Mike Frankovich, Katharine Hepburn, General and Mrs. Omar Bradley, Gregory Peck, Robert Stack, James Arness, and Kirk Douglas, testified to Congress of the merit and deservedness of this award. On June 9, 1980, Wayne was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Jimmy Carter, at whose inaugural ball Wayne had appeared "as a member of the loyal opposition," as Wayne described it in his speech to the gathering. In 1998 Wayne was awarded the Naval Heritage Award by the U S Navy Memorial Foundation for his support of the U S Navy and military during his film career. Cultural Image As An American Icon Wayne rose beyond the typical recognition for a famous actor to that of an enduring icon who symbolized and communicated American values and ideals. By the middle of his career, Wayne had developed a larger-than-life image, and as his career progressed, he selected roles that would not compromise his off-screen image. By the time of his last film The Shootist (1976), Wayne refused to allow his character to shoot a man in the back as was originally scripted, saying "I've made over 250 pictures and have never shot a guy in the back. Change it." Wayne's rise to being the quintessential movie war hero began to take shape four years after World War II, when Sands of Iwo Jima (1949) was released. His footprints at Grauman's Chinese theater in Hollywood were laid in concrete that contained sand from Iwo Jima. His status grew so large and legendary that when Japanese Emperor Hirohito visited the United States in 1975, he asked to meet John Wayne, the symbolic representation of his country's former enemy. Wayne was a popular visitor to the war zones in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. By the 1950s, perhaps in large part due to the military aspect of films such as the Sands of Iwo Jima, Flying Tigers, They Were Expendable, and the Ford cavalry trilogy, Wayne had become an icon to all the branches of the United States Armed Forces, even in light of his actual lack of military service. Many veterans have said their reason for serving was in some part related to watching Wayne's movies. His name is attached to various pieces of gear, such as the P-38 "John Wayne" can opener, so named because "it can do anything", paper towels known as "John Wayne toilet paper" because "it's rough and it's tough and don't take shit off no one," and C-ration crackers are called "John Wayne crackers" because presumably only someone as tough as Wayne could eat them. A rough and rocky mountain pass used by military tanks and jeeps at Fort Irwin in San Bernardino County, California, is aptly named "John Wayne Pass". Wayne is the only actor to appear in every edition of the annual Harris Poll of Most Popular Film Actors, and the only deceased actor to appear on the list after his death. Wayne has been in the top ten in this poll for 19 consecutive years, starting 15 years after his death in 1979. Academy Award Wayne was nominated for three Academy Awards, which are presented annually by the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize excellence in the film industry, winning one of them. Golden Globe The Golden Globe Awards are presented annually by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) to recognize outstanding achievements in the entertainment industry, both domestic and foreign, and to focus wide public attention upon the best in motion pictures and television. Wayne won a Golden Globe Award for his performance in "True Grit". The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures is an annual award given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. It was named in honor of Cecil B. DeMille (1881–1959), one of the industry's most successful filmmakers; John Wayne won this particular award in 1966. Filmography Main articles at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: John Wayne filmography (1926–1940), John Wayne filmography (1941–1960), and John Wayne filmography (1961–1976) See also on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Hall of Great Western Performers List of film director and actor collaborations National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum Red Scare

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Person Photo

Birth Name

Marion Robert Morrison

Birth Place

Winterset, Iowa, USA

Birth Date

5/26/1907

Death Date

6/11/1979
Known For
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Rio Bravo

Sheriff John T. Chance

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The Searchers

Ethan Edwards

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The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Tom Doniphon

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El Dorado

Cole Thornton

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McLintock!

George Washington McLintock

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Hatari!

Sean Mercer

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Red River

Thomas Dunson

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The Quiet Man

Sean Thornton

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The Sons of Katie Elder

John Elder

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Stagecoach

The Ringo Kid

Starring In
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Clint Eastwood, la dernière légende

Self (archive footage)

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My Name Is Alfred Hitchcock

Self (archive footage)

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The Fabulous Allan Carr

Self (archive footage)

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Keith Richards: Under the Influence

Ethan Edwards (uncredited)

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Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff

Self (archive footage)

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Farewell

Self (archive footage)

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1939: Hollywood's Greatest Year

Himself (archive footage)

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I'm King Kong!: The Exploits of Merian C. Cooper

Ethan Edwards (archive footage)

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Ban the Sadist Videos!

Self (archive footage)

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This Film Is Not Yet Rated

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Edith Head: The Paramount Years

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John Wayne on Film

Himself (archive footage)

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Warner Bros. 75th Anniversary: No Guts, No Glory

(archive footage) (uncredited)

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La Classe Américaine

George Abitbol (archive footage)

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Oscar's Greatest Moments

Himself (archive footage)

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Ca détourne

MC François (archive footage)

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Red Skelton: King of Laughter

Self (archive footage)

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House II: The Second Story

Cowboy (archive footage) (uncredited)

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Fist of Fear, Touch of Death

Himself, at the Academy Awards (archive footage) (uncredited)

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John Wayne: The Duke Lives on - A Tribute

Self (archive footage)

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The Shootist

J.B. Books

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Rooster Cogburn

Rooster Cogburn

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Brannigan

Lt. Brannigan

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McQ

McQ

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Cahill U.S. Marshal

U.S. Marshal J.D. Cahill

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The Train Robbers

Lane

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Dreckiges Gold

Lane

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Cancel My Reservation

John Wayne (uncredited)

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The Cowboys

Wil Andersen

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The Great American West of John Ford

Himself - Narrator

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Big Jake

Jacob McCandles

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Directed by John Ford

Self (1969)

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Rio Lobo

Col. Cord McNally

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Chisum

John Chisum

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Swing Out, Sweet Land

John Wayne - Host

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The Undefeated

Col. John Henry Thomas

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True Grit

Rooster Cogburn

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Hellfighters

Chance Buckman

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The Green Berets

Col. Mike Kirby

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Skidoo

Captain Rockwell Torrey (clip from "In Harm's Way") (archive footage) (uncredited)

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El Dorado

Cole Thornton

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The War Wagon

Taw Jackson

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Cast a Giant Shadow

Gen. Mike Randolph

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The Sons of Katie Elder

John Elder

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In Harm's Way

Rock

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The Greatest Story Ever Told

Centurion at crucifixion

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Circus World

Matt Masters

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McLintock!

George Washington McLintock

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Donovan's Reef

Michael Patrick 'Guns' Donovan

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How the West Was Won

Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman

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The Longest Day

Lt. Col. Benjamin Vandervoort

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Hatari!

Sean Mercer

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The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Tom Doniphon

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The Comancheros

Ranger Capt. Jake Cutter

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North To Alaska

Sam McCord

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The Alamo

Col. Davy Crockett

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The Horse Soldiers

Col. John Marlowe

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Rio Bravo

Sheriff John T. Chance

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I Married a Woman

John Wayne (uncredited)

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The Barbarian And The Geisha

Townsend Harris

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Legend of the Lost

Joe January

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The Wings of Eagles

Frank W. 'Spig' Wead

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Jet Pilot

Col. Jim Shannon

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The Conqueror

Temujin, later Genghis Khan

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The Searchers

Ethan Edwards

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Blood Alley

Capt. Tom Wilder

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The Sea Chase

Captain Karl Ehrlich

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The High and the Mighty

Dan Roman

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Hondo

Hondo Lane

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Island In The Sky

Capt. Dooley

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Trouble Along the Way

Stephen 'Steve' Aloysius Williams

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The Quiet Man

Sean Thornton

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Big Jim McLain

Jim McLain

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Flying Leathernecks

Maj. Daniel Xavier Kirby

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Operation Pacific

Lt Cmdr. Duke E. Gifford

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Rio Grande

Lt. Col. Kirby Yorke

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Sands of Iwo Jima

Sgt. John M. Stryker

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She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

Capt. Nathan Cutting Brittles

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The Fighting Kentuckian

John Breen

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3 Godfathers

Robert Marmaduke Hightower

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Red River

Thomas Dunson

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Fort Apache

Capt. Kirby York

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Wake of the Red Witch

Capt. Ralls

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Tycoon

Johnny

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Angel and the Badman

Quirt Evans

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Without Reservations

Rusty

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Desert Command

Tom Wayne (archive footage)

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They Were Expendable

Lt. (J.G.) 'Rusty' Ryan

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Back to Bataan

Col. Joseph Madden

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Flame of Barbary Coast

Duke Fergus

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Dakota

John Devlin

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Tall in the Saddle

Rocklin

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The Fighting Seabees

Lt. Cmdr. Wedge Donovan

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A Lady Takes a Chance

Duke Hudkins

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War of the Wildcats

Daniel F. Somers

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Reunion in France

Pat Talbot

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Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Markham

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Flying Tigers

Capt. Jim Gordon

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The Spoilers

Roy Glennister

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Reap the Wild Wind

Captain Jack Stuart

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Lady for a Night

Jackson Morgan

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In Old California

Tom Craig

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The Shepherd of the Hills

Young Matt

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A Man Betrayed

Lynn Hollister

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Lady from Louisiana

John Reynolds

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The Long Voyage Home

Olsen

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Seven Sinners

Dan

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Three Faces West

John Phillips

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Dark Command

Bob Seton

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Wyoming Outlaw

Stony Brooke

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Stagecoach

The Ringo Kid

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Three Texas Steers

Stony Brooke

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New Frontier

Stony Brooke

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Allegheny Uprising

James Smith

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The Night Riders

Stony Brooke

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Santa Fe Stampede

Stony Brooke

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Red River Range

Stony Brooke

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Pals of the Saddle

Stony Brooke

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Overland Stage Raiders

Stony Brooke

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Born to the West

Dare Rudd

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Idol of the Crowds

Johnny Hanson

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I Cover the War!

Bob Adams

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The Sea Spoilers

Bob Randall

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Winds of the Wasteland

John Blair

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King of the Pecos

John Clayborn

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The Lawless Nineties

John Tipton

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Wie vom Winde verweht

Capt. John Ashley

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The New Frontier

John Dawson

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Westward Ho

John Wyatt

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Paradise Canyon

John Wyatt / John Rogers

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The Dawn Rider

John Mason

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The Desert Trail

John Scott, aka John Jones

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Rainbow Valley

John Martin

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Texas Terror

John Higgins

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Lawless Range

John Middleton

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Westwärts

John Wyatt

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'Neath the Arizona Skies

Chris Morrell

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The Lawless Frontier

John Tobin/Singin' Sandy Saunders

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The Trail Beyond

Singin' Sandy Saunders

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The Star Packer

U.S. Marshal John Travers

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Randy Rides Alone

Randy Bowers

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The Man from Utah

John Weston

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Blue Steel

John Carruthers

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West of the Divide

Ted Hayden aka Gat Ganns

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The Lucky Texan

Jerry Mason

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Sagebrush Trail

John Brant

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Riders of Destiny

Singin' Sandy Saunders

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Baby Face

Jimmy McCoy Jr.

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His Private Secretary

Dick Wallace

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The Life of Jimmy Dolan

Smith

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Somewhere in Sonora

John Bishop

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The Man from Monterey

Captain John Holmes

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Central Airport

Co-Pilot in Wreck (uncredited)

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The Telegraph Trail

John Trent

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The Three Musketeers

Lt. Tom Wayne

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The Big Stampede

Deputy Sheriff John Steele

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The Hurricane Express

Larry Baker

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Two-Fisted Law

Duke

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Texas Cyclone

Steve Pickett

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The Shadow of the Eagle

Craig McCoy

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Haunted Gold

John Mason

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Ride Him Cowboy

John Drury

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Lady and Gent

Buzz Kinney

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The Range Feud

Clint Turner

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Arizona

Lt. Bob Denton

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The Big Trail

Breck Coleman

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Men Without Women

Radioman on Surface (uncredited)

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The Black Watch

42nd Highlander (uncredited)

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Hangman's House / 3 Bad Men

Horse Race Spectator / Condemned Man in Flashback (uncredited)

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Four Sons

Officer (uncredited)

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Noah's Ark

Flood Extra (uncredited)

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Mother Machree

Extra (uncredited)

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The Drop Kick

Football Player / Extra in Stands (uncredited)

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Bardelys the Magnificent

Guard (uncredited)

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The Great K & A Train Robbery

Extra (uncredited)

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